Skip to content →

Teaching

I frequently teach courses in the history of philosophy, most frequently an undergraduate survey of the history of Modern Philosophy (PHL 211), which is offered every Spring semester. Each Spring semester, I also teach the upper-division Metaphysics seminar (PHL 461), which covers two to three topics (e.g., causation and free will) in detail. I also commonly teach an introductory Logic and Reasoning course (PHL 130).

Each Fall semester, I offer a survey course, Knowledge and Reality (PHL 361), which examines the central problems of metaphysics and epistemology. And starting this year I’ll be offering another new survey course, Paradoxes (PHL 225), which will provide an overview of the bizarre and fascinating paradoxes that arise in almost every area of philosophical inquiry. Logic, metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of science, decision theory, and ethics all involve surprising and difficult paradoxes, which we’ll attempt to solve (or dissolve) in this course.

If you’re a student at MSU interested in any of these topics, I encourage you to contact me! I’m always happy to talk with students to help them figure out what Philosophy classes they would be likely to find most engaging. 

Below is a list of my recent and upcoming courses; the course websites are available to students through d2l.msu.edu.

Spring 2021 — PHL 461: Metaphysics — PHL 211: Modern Philosophy — PHL 130: Logic and Reasoning

Fall 2020 — PHL 225: Paradoxes (PHL 225) — PHL 361: Knowledge and Reality

Spring 2020 — PHL 461: Metaphysics — PHL 211: Modern Philosophy — PHL 130: Logic and Reasoning

Fall 2019 — PHL 361: Knowledge and Reality — PHL 130: Logic and Reasoning

css.php